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Some images from the island of Maui in Hawaii.

How the Hawaiian Islands were formed:


The Earth’s outer crust is made up of a series of tectonic plates that move very slowly over the surface of the planet. Volcanos can form where these tectonic plates come together.  Volcanos can also form in the middle of a plate on what is known as a "hot spot".  A hot spot of lava pours out onto the ocean floor from time to time causing it to rise over the course of millions of years.  As this continues , the volcano eventually breaks the surface of the ocean to create an island.  Because these islands are in the middle of a tectonic they become anchored to the plate and move with it (about 1 to 2 inches per year).


Hawaii's geological history began about 65 million years ago on one of these hot spots as the oldest island began to form.  The newest island, Hawaii (or "The Big Island") broke the surface of the Pacific Ocean an estimated 50,000 years ago.  It is interesting to note that, as a general rule, the smaller the island the older it is.  That is because the older islands have had far more time to erode.


On the oldest islands in the Hawaiian Island chain the volcanos are essentially dead.  This is because the tectonic plate they are anchored to has moved away from the hot spot that formed them (at an inch or two per year this took millions of years).


Hawaii's newest island in the chain is Hawaii ("the Big Island").  It has two active volcanoes. These volcanoes are from the same hot spot that created the dead volcanoes on older islands. Millions of years from now there may be another island in the chain of Hawaiian islands.  It's also likely some of the smaller islands with dead volcanos will disappear beneath the oceans surface.

                                                                                                            (Reference:  Live Science,  Wikipedia)

Maui, Hawaii

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Maui 2:  Late afternoon sky over the Pacific Ocean with a lone sailboat in the horizon.


Camera settings:

Canon Rebel XT

Shutter speed:  1/500

Aperture: f/16

ISO: 250


Maui 3:  A view of the Mountains from one of the island pineapple plantations


Camera settings:

Canon Rebel XT

Shutter speed:  1/400.

Aperture: f/13

ISO: 240


Maui 4: Underwater Submarine adventure, Lahaina Harbor.

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Camera settings:

Canon Rebel XT

Shutter speed:  1/500.

Aperture: f/5.6

ISO: 1600


Maui 5:  Another view of the Mountains.


Camera settings:

Canon Rebel XT

Shutter speed:  1/200.

Aperture: f/16

ISO: 400

Canon 18-55 EF-S lens

Focal Length:  25mm

Maui 6:  Sunset over Maui


Camera settings:

Canon Rebel XT

Shutter speed:  1/500.

Aperture: f/14

ISO: 1600

Canon 18-55 EF-S lens

Focal Length:  55mm

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Maui 1: A small beach visited on a trip around the island.


Camera settings:

Canon Rebel XT

Shutter speed: 1/400

Aperture: f/16

ISO: 400



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Maui 7: A coastal beach scene.  one of many on the island of Maui.


Camera settings:

Canon Rebel XT

Shutter speed:  1/500.

Aperture: f/14

ISO: 400

Canon 18-55 EF-S lens

Focal Length:  18mm

Photography By

John Stankovich          

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